Harrell Families

of Early

Hertford County, North Carolina

   

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HarrellFamilies (Home Page)

Introduction

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 (The Early Harrells in America)

Chapter 2 (Harrells in Chowan County & the Gates area)

Chapter 4 (Hertford County's 1st, 2nd, & 3rd Generations)

Chapter 5 (John T., Eley, Elijah Two, Elisah, Thomas Two & their descendants)

Chapter 6 (Nathan & Elizabeth's Known Descendants)

Chapter 7 (John [b. c. 1794] & Winnifred Harrell, 3rd Generation)

Chapter 8 (Josiah & Anna Harrell, 3rd Generation)

Chapter 9 (Elizabeth Harrell & Silas Parker, 3rd Generation)

Chapter 10 (Immigrants to the 3rd Generation of Hertford County Harrells)

Chapter 11 (Immigrants to the 4th Generation of Hertford County Harrells)

 

Chapter 3: Harrells in Bertie & the Hertford County area

 

             In the previous chapter, I pulled together the information I had, mostly from deeds, wills, and the work of other researchers to describe the first Harrells in the Gates area of early Chowan County. In this chapter, I have done the same for early Bertie County. The early Harrells in Bertie County were greater in number than in Chowan County—they were: Thomas, Samuel, Joseph, John Jr./Sr., Abraham, Edward, Francis, and Richard. In addition, there were three families headed by Isaac, George, and Absolom Harrell who seem to be in the same area, yet remote from the other Harrells in Bertie County. I have termed them “unattached Harrells.”

 

Thomas Harrell (of Bertie County)

 

            There were at least two Thomas Harrells residing in Chowan County in the early years; and there was at least one other in Bertie County. The latter was probably the first out of Nansemond County, Virginia, and he settled just north of the Roanoke River in southern Bertie County.

 

            Thomas Harrell got a right of assignment for 640 acres on the Moratuck River on December 3, 1720, and the deed was dated May 2, 1721.[1] He was apparently very active in affairs of property well into the 1730s, judging by deed activity (Table 4, page 20).

 

            There are a number of deeds recorded in Bertie County on which Thomas Harrell was a witness—in some cases he used the title “jurat;” in others he did not. I am not absolutely sure it was the same Thomas in every case. For instance, on February 12, 1734, Thomas Harrell, jurat, witnessed a deed for land on the north side of Morattock River. Then again, on March 21, 1735, Thomas witnessed a deed along with George House for a transaction between John Moore and Titus Moore. At the same time, during the November Court 1736, Thomas Harrell along with Petegrove Salsberry, jurat, witnessed another deed for John Moore. On both of these latter deeds, Thomas did not use the title “jurat” as he had in February of 1734—the recorder of the documents did use the title for Salsberry. Then on another deed in December of 1736, Thomas was a witness along with Francis Harrell, and in this case he again used the title of “jurat.” This deed included the following information: it was for land adjacent to “Snowfields” at Fallen Run, and William Gray, and William Eason. It was witnessed by John Gray, Francis Harrell, Thomas Harrell, jurat. This deed was presented at the May Court of 1739. At the same court, Thomas witnessed another deed, but did not use the title of “jurat.”[2] At best, this is evidence for uncertainty. If we assume that men of means, in the time and place under consideration, seldom miss the opportunity to use a title beside their name, then maybe there were two Thomas Harrells witnessing deeds in Bertie County in the 1730s.

 [page 55]

            There is a deed that makes reference to Thomas Jr., but that is not definitive either on the question of there being more than one Thomas in the area. The deed is dated May 4, 1738, and was between William Baldwin of Surry County, Virginia and Samuel Buxton of James City County, Virginia for the sale of 250 acres on the north side of the Moratuck River, adjacent to Thomas Harrell, Jr. at Spring Branch.[3] By 1738, Thomas may have given some of his 640 acres to a son named Thomas Junior. On the other hand, Thomas may have been known as Jr. to people still back in Virginia where there was a Thomas and a Thomas Jr. as early as 1704. In any case, I will continue at this time to assume there was only one Thomas Harrell among the first settlers in Bertie County.

 

            Thomas Harrell of Bertie County purchased another 300 acres in the area in 1743. On June 13, 1743, Thomas Harrell bought 300 acres (for 40 lbs.) from Caleb and Elizabeth Spivey adjacent to William Hinton on Village Swamp, and Theophilus Williams. A witness to the deed was Samuel Harrell. On the same day Thomas Harrell sold Samuel Harrell 150 acres (for 20 lbs.) on the east side of Village swamp adjacent to William Hinton, Pettegrove Salsberry, Theophilus Williams, and ______ Bond.[4] In the latter deed, there is a very real possibility that Thomas was selling half the land he just bought to Samuel at his cost because Samuel was his brother or son.

 

            By the 1750s there were at least two Thomas Harrells in Bertie County. One lived down around the Roanoke and was the son of Edward; the other lived up in the Hertford Area near Horse Swamp and was the son of Adam. (See the tax lists summarized in Table 5, page 26) These two second generation Thomases are discussed in the sections on Edward and Adam.

 

Samuel Harrell (of Bertie County)

 

            Samuel was probably related to the Thomas Harrell described in the previous section. He purchased 150 acres from Thomas Harrell in 1743 at Thomas’ cost.[5] He was also on the Bertie County tax lists from 1757 through 1761 (see Table 5, page 26). Samuel’s will was written in 1770, and presented at the September Court in 1772. Samuel identified his wife, Elizabeth; his son Cader; his daughters Kesiah Bond, Dorothy Billups, and Ann Harrell.[6]

 

Cader Harrell, son of Samuel (died 1781)

 

            Cader’s will was written in 1775, and probated at the August Court of 1781. In his will, he identified his wife, Agnes; and his sons Samuel, Kader, and Drewry.[7] Elizabeth Harrell was a witness—she may have been his mother.

 [page 56]

Samuel Harrell, son of Cader

Kader Harrell, son of Cader

Drewry Harrell, son of Cader

 

Joseph Harrell (died c. 1754)

 

            Joseph was probably the second of the “Seven Brothers” to settle in North Carolina from Nansemond County. He is on record with his first land purchase in 1725. The deed states on August 12, 1725, Joseph Harrell of Nansemond County, Virginia bought 200 acres from James Smith on the north side of the Morattock River, adjacent to William Evans, William Eason, and John Elverton, “nigh a place called redy Branch” at Flaggy Run.[8]

 

            Three years later, Joseph was a witness when John Jr. bought 630 acres from Henry Baker just north of the Roanoke River on August 12, 1728. Then again in May of 1729, when John of Nansemond County bought 8 acres adjacent to Henry Baker and John Harrell, the deed was witnessed by Joseph Harrell and Abraham Hurrell (Harrell).[9] John of Nansemond was Senior, and the John Harrell who lived adjacent to the land bring purchased was John Junior, but the latter would later name his son John, and thus John Junior became John Jr./Sr. in my references. (The John Harrells are discussed at greater length in the next section.)

 

            On August 7, 1729, Joseph sold 100 acres to Abraham Harrell adjacent to William Eason at Reedy Branch, and John Yelverton on Flag Run.[10] This was clearly half of the land Joseph had purchased four years earlier. This is typical of transactions between brothers, and that may well have been the case here.

 

            On August 30, 1733, Joseph was again a witness to a deed with John Harrell, jurat. Joseph was often a co-witness with this John Harrell. The question is which John was this? I do not yet know how to interpret the title, “jurat” in many cases. One definition states, “Jurat: Literally, ‘it was proven’; early, a magistrate; that subscribing witness who swore to or affirmed the validity of any writing; …”[11] This matters because if it indicated John was a magistrate, it might refer to the person who later was known as John Harrell Esq. of the St. Johns and Ahoskie area (the Hertford area). If on the other hand, it merely referred to the act of being a witness, it could have been any one of the John Harrells in the area. On August 3, 1733, Abraham Harrell bought more land and the witnesses to the deed were John Harrell, jurat, John Harrell Junior.[12] This suggests that John the jurat, had taken for himself a title which meant nothing more than a witness, because John Jr./Sr. often was a co-witness with his son, John Junior. In 1733, Joseph was more than likely a co-witness with his probable brother, John Jr./Sr., not John Harrell Esq. of the Hertford area.

 [page 57]

            Joseph was again a witness along with John and Edward Harrell on a deed in the Roanoke River area in 1735. John and Joseph again witnessed a deed on February 7, 1742.[13] 

 

            Joseph Harrell Sr. bought 300 acres from Thomas Pugh on April 3, 1753. The land was at Flaggy Run, adjacent to the lands of Jethro Butler, and John Harrell (probably John Jr./Sr.). The deed was witnessed by John Harrell, Abraham Harrell, Mary Harrell—probably his brothers and wife or sister-in-law. Less than a year later, Joseph Jr. identified his father’s 1753 purchase when Joseph Jr. gave 20 acres to his brother. (This suggests that Joseph Sr. died before February 23, 1754.) On February 23, 1754, Joseph Harrell made a deed of gift for 20 acres to his brother, John Harrell—he identified the land as “… a tract of land purchased by my father Joseph Harrell from Thomas Pugh and commonly called by the name of Sympsons Old Field… to him during his natural life…. Land on Flagg Run adj. James Parker, John Naren(?). wit John Harrell, George Howse, Ezekiel Harrell.”[14]

           

            When the division of Joseph Sr.’s estate was made, his wife, Ann, had already remarried to James Williams. The division of property was to Ann’s new husband, James Williams, and to son, John Harrell.[15] Joseph Jr. apparently already had inherited property from his father. When Joseph Sr. and Ann Harrell’s son, John, wrote his will on June 3, 1781, he identified his mother, Ann Williams; his sisters Winnefred Harrell and Ruth House, and his half brother George Williams.[16] George Williams was also an executor to the will which means he was probably over 21 years old at the time, and thus born before 1760—which means Joseph Sr.’s widow, Ann, remarried before 1759.

 

Joseph and Ann Harrell’s Children

 

Joseph Harrell Jr.

 

            The only document to connect Joseph Jr. with any certainty to his parents is the 1754 deed—in which Joseph Harrell Jr. made a deed of gift for 20 acres to his brother, John Harrell, and he identified the land as coming from his father, Joseph Harrell.[17]

 

            In the tax lists for early Bertie County, there were two Joseph Harrells. The first was listed in 1755 for the last time; and the other in the same area was listed for the first time in 1761. These were probably Joseph Sr., and his son, Joseph Junior.

 

John “Little John” Harrell (died 1781)

 

            In 1754, when Little John’s brother, Joseph Jr., gave him 20 acres they had inherited from their father, who had died shortly before the gift, Little John was still under legal age. Major Thomas Pugh was the “Guardian of John Harrell, orphan of Joseph.”[18]

 [page 58]

            Joseph Sr.’s probable nephew, John Jr. (the son of John Jr./Sr. discussed in the next section of this chapter), owned land next to Joseph  and the Williams, and in his 1755 will John Jr. described the land at length, including the statement, “… and Little John Harrells Corner, then along my line and John Harrells aforesaid to John Glass’s Line,…”[19] I am pretty sure the reference to “Little John” was to Joseph’s son, John, and not to John Harrell Jr.’s father, John Jr./Senior. When Little John wrote his will on June 3, 1781, he mentioned his mother, Ann Williams, his  sisters, Ruth House and Winnefred Harrell, and a nephew, Thomas House—there was no mention of a wife or children.[20]

Ruth Harrell House

 

            Ruth had a son named by her brother, John, in his 1781 will—he was Thomas House.

Winnefred Harrell

 

John Harrell (this was John Jr./Sr.; died 1759)

 

            There were a number of John Harrells swarming the landscape of northeastern North Carolina in the early years—knowing one from another is not an easy task today. Some of them made the task easier by using identification tags such as “Jr.,” “Sr.,” or “Esquire.” Unfortunately, too often they were simply referred to as “John.” In this section, I have described the line of John Harrells who were better than most in identifying themselves—this line starts with John of Nansemond and his son, John Jr.; the latter soon became John Sr., when his son in turn, came of age and became John Junior. The primary focus in this section in on the middle John, John Jr./Sr., because he was among the first Harrells to settle his household in North Carolina. (note: John of Nansemond’s will was probated in Bertie County in 1749; his son, John Jr./Sr., died in 1759; and John of Nansemond’s grandson, John Jr., died in 1755, before his father died in 1759.)

 

            I believe the first John Harrell to purchase land in North Carolina was John of Nansemond County, Virginia. He probably was the John who bought 150 acres in Tyrrell County in October of 1715.[21] The land was on the south side of Albemarle Sound, only about 30 miles east of where numerous Harrells would begin settling a few years later over on the north side of the Roanoke River in Bertie County.

 

            John Harrell Jr./Sr. was one of the first Harrells to settle in Bertie County just above the Roanoke, and he probably was a brother to one of the Samuels, Thomas, and Joseph Harrell discussed in the three previous sections—and, of course, he was the son of John of Nansemond. The latter point is evident in the early references to him as John Jr. in the North Carolina records when he purchased 630 acres on the north side of the Roanoke River in August of 1728. The deed  was written on August 12, 1728, and contained the following information: John Harrell Jr. bought 630 acres from Henry Baker. They were on the north side of the Morattock (Roanoke) River at Flaggy Run, adjacent to John Narin and James Parker. One of  the witnesses was Joseph Harrell.[22]

 [page 59]

            In a 1729 deed, John of Nansemond bought more land down on the north side of  the Roanoke River, adjacent to the other Harrells. His probable son, Joseph, witnessed the deed, along with Abraham, who was also probably one of his sons. I believe he was instrumental in setting his sons up in the area—first Thomas around 1721, then Joseph in 1725, and Abraham was in the area by 1729. On May 11, 1729, John Harrell of Nansemond County, bought 8 acres (for 32 shillings) from James Smith on the north side of the Morattuck River and south side of Flagg Run. The land was adjacent to Henry Baker and John Harrell. The witnesses were Joseph Harrell and Abraham Harrell.[23] The eight acres he bought were apparently next to the land of his son, John Jr./Senior. A few months later, in December of 1729, Edward Harrell of Nansemond County bought 350 acres in the same area as Joseph and John. The witnesses were John Jr./Sr., his wife, Grace, and their son, John Junior.[24]

 

            Then in early 1733, it appears John Jr./Sr. had taken for himself the title “jurat.” (As I have indicated above, the title “jurat” was apparently easily acquired and did not carry a lot of meaning.) On February 11, 1733/34, Needham Bryan bought 200 acres from Timothy Ryall on the north side of Flaggy Run, adjacent to John Harrell and Joseph Moor. The witnesses were John Harrell, jurat, John Harrell, Junior. John Jr./Sr. used the title again when he witnessed a deed for his probable brother, Abraham, in 1733. On August 3, 1733, Abraham Harrell bought 150 acres, and the witnesses were John Harrell, jurat, and John Harrell Junior.[25]

 

            In the deed just below, I am assuming the purchase was by John Jr./Sr. because John Jr. was a witness, but this may well not have been the case. By 1737, another John Harrell was buying land in the same area, and this deed may have been executed by this “new” John Harrell. The deed was witnessed by Edward Harrell—Edward had a son named John. (I have discussed this other John below as the probably son of Edward.) On March 22, 1737, John Harrell bought 24 acres from Jacob Jarnagan and Feaby Jarnagan and Henry Oberry. It was called “a tract of woodland” in Cassey Swamp, adjacent to Edward Harrell and Thomas Mann. The witnesses were Edward Harrell, John Harrell Junior. Then on February 13, 1738/39, John bought 200 acres on the west side of Cashy Swamp.[26]

 

            On November 14, 1747, John Harrell Jr./Sr. bought 640 acres from Thomas Barker in Roonaroy Meadows adjacent to Tom and George Pollock’s corner, William Eason. Land granted to William Maul by patent dated Feb. 1, 1725. It was commonly called Broad Neck Survey. This land is in southern Bertie County, down on the Roanoke River. This becomes important because it is the land described in John Jr./Sr.’s November 1, 1756 will, and divided among his sons. The description of the land in the will makes it clear the November 14, 1747 deed was a purchase made by John Jr./Senior. In addition, the division of the 640 acres described in the will, simply reflected the gift of these lands several years earlier. There are three deeds of gift from John Jr./Sr. dated May 13, 1751 that transfer this property.[27]

 

            In the first of the above mentioned 1751 deeds describing the distribution of lands to John Jr./Sr.’s sons, David is shown distributing land to his brothers—land said to have been granted to him in 1749. I have not been able to find a record of that grant, but the following one to his father probably explains the connection. On March 25, 1749, The Hon. John Carteret, Earl of Granville granted to John [page 60] Harrell, for 3 shillings, 200 acres in the Society Parish on the north side of the Roanoke River, adjacent to Richard Williams at Bushy Gutt, and Jethro Butler. Provided the land be seated, a good house be built, and the land stocked with cattle at a rate of five head per hundred acres.[28]

 

            A 1753 deed reflects the presence of several of the Harrells in the area from three generations—including John Jr./Sr.; his son, Jesse; his grandson, Israel; and son, Hardy (Israel Hardy). On January 20, 1753, a deed for the sale of 200 acres on the north side of the Roanoke was drawn which described the land as adjacent to Needham Bryan, Matthew Turner, Isaac Harrell, Caleb Spivey, and Theophilus Williams. The witnesses were John, Jesse, Israel Harrell, Hardy Harrell.[29]

 

            The following two deeds were also more than likely for John Jr./Sr., but the reference is not altogether clear: On March 10, 1755, John Harrell bought 50 acres from John Yealverton of Edgecombe; adjacent to ____ Parker, Abraham Harrell, George House, and ______ Baker. The witnesses included Hardy Harrell (a son of John Jr./Sr.). Then on February 15, 1756, John Harrell bought 60 acres on the north side of the Roanoke River. The land was part of a patent granted to Ben. Foreman at Mill Branch, and was adjacent to John Harrell Junior.[30]

 

            John Harrell Jr. died before his father, John Jr./Sr. He wrote his will on November 8, 1755 in Bertie County, and it was probated in the January Court, 1756.[31] The death of his son probably moved John Harrell Jr./Sr. to write his will November 1, 1756 in Bertie County. He provided for the grandchildren of his three deceased children, John Jr., Esias, and Sarah Williams. He added a codicil to his will in October 1758 that made clear none of his property should go to the surviving spouses of his three deceased children. John Sr.’s will was probated in the April Court, 1759.[32] He divided his real estate as follows:

 

To his wife, Grace, during her life time or widowhood, the use of the Plantation on which he then lived. Following her death or remarriage, the land was to be divided among these heirs;

To son Jesse, the Plantation on which John Sr. was then living.

To son David, 160 acres on which David was already living, and which was part of a Tract that John Sr. had purchased from Thomas Barker.

To son Josiah, 160 acres on which Josiah was then living, and which was also part of the Tract bought from Mr. Barker.

To son Ezekiel, 160 acres on which he was then living, and which was again part of the land bought from Thomas Barker.

To grandson Esias, the son of Esias, goes the Plantation on which his mother and step-father are now living, which was part of the Tract bought from Mr. Barker.

 

John Jr./Sr. and Grace Harrell’s Descendants

 [page 61]

  

            The following list is a summary of John Jr./Sr. and Grace’s descendants:

 

Children                    Grandchildren                         First Appearance & Notes

David                                                                                                     (will in 1767)

                                                David

                                                Noah

                                                Charity

                                                Sarah

                                                Mildred

                                                Chloe

Josiah                                                                                                     first witnessed deed 1751, will in 1773

                                                Solomon

                                                Josiah

                                                William

Selah

Pennie

Ezechiel (wife Alee)                                                                             (will 1764) (Alie remarries Owen)

                                                Israel Hardy                                          (will in 1780, not married)

                                                Grace Pierce

                                                Patience

                                                Esther

                                                Edith

                                                Delilah Owens

Jesse (wife Fereby)                                                                              (will 1788)

                                                Priscilla Vinson

                                                Josiah Harrell

                                                Freebee Roundtree

                                                Jesse Harrell Jr.

                                                Rachel Rascoe

                                                Josuah Harrell

                                                Jonathan Harrell

Esias                                                                                                       (deceased by 1756)

          Esais

                                                Sarah

Hardy (Israel Hardy)                                                                            (gone by 1756)

John Jr. (wife Mary)                                                                             (deceased by 1756)

                                                George                                                   witnessed deed, 1754

                                                Jesse

                                                Elisha

                                                Benjamin (wife Winney)     (will 1775)

                                                Mary

Sarah Williams                                                                                      (deceased by 1756)

 

 

David Harrell (b. c. 1730)

 

            In his father’s 1756 will, David was given the land he was currently living on, 160 acres from the parcel bought from Thomas Barker (Baker)—the gift deed is dated 1751.

 

            Before 1751, however, David also owned about 200 acres that his father was also somehow involved with. One of the 1751 deeds shows David selling about 70 acres to his brothers Jesse, Elias, and Josiah for one pound, ten shillings each. The acres were part of a grant to David in 1749. The grant [page 62] referred to must have been one his father first received—on March 25, 1749, The Hon. John Carteret, Earl of Granville granted to John Harrell, for 3 shillings, 200 acres in the Society Parish on the north side of the Roanoke River, adjacent to Richard Williams at Bushy Gutt, and Jethro Butler.[33]

 

            There is a will dated January 5, 1767 for David Harrell. He names his wife, Charity; his sons David and Noah; daughters Charity, Sarah, Mildred, and Chloe Harrell. The executors were Joseph Harrell, David Harrell, and Noah Hinton. Witnesses were Benjamin Wimberly and William Vann.[34] Son, David Jr., was probably 21 or over in 1767—so, born before 1745, which suggests his father was born well before 1730.

 

David and Charity’s children were as follows.

 

David Harrell Jr. (b. before 1745)
Noah Harrell

 

            Noah was a witness on his cousin, Josiah’s 1783 will, along with Noah Hinton who was on many of the Harrell wills in this area, including Noah’s father’s will in 1767.[35]

 

Charity Harrell
Sarah Harrell
Mildred Harrell
Chloe Harrell

 

Josiah Harrell Sr. (b. before 1730)

 

            John Jr./Sr. and Grace Harrell’s son, Josiah, witnessed a deed in Bertie County in 1751, for a neighbor, Needham Byran, which indicates he was probably born before 1730.[36]

 

            As in the case of his brother, David, Josiah inherited his share, 160 acres, of the land his father had purchased from Thomas Barker. Josiah was also living on the land when his father wrote his will in 1756—probably from around the time of the deed of gift from his father in 1751. In addition, Josiah received from his brother, David, about 70 acres on the north side of the Roanoke River which was part of a grant David had received in 1749.

 [page 63]

            Apparently Josiah Harrell spent some time on a legal career—he was a Justice in Bertie County during and around the year 1768.[37]

 

            Josiah Harrell’s will was written on March 30, 1773, and probated on November 12, 1773 in Bertie County. Josiah’s son, Solomon, received the 160 acres that Josiah had inherited from his father—the land was in the Renneroy Marshes. His son, Josiah Jr., received the land and plantation on which Josiah Sr. was living when he wrote his will in 1773. This was more than likely the approximately 70 acres Josiah received from his brother, David in 1751. Josiah’s son, William, was named but did not receive any land. Josiah also named his wife, Ann, and daughters, Selah and Penny—as well as any child of his not yet born. The executors were Edward Tool and Noah Hinton; the witnesses were James Churhwell, Jonathan Tool, and Mary Tool.[38] Based on the 1773 will, Josiah and Ann had three sons and two daughters. They are listed just below.

 

Solomon Harrell (b. c. 1750)

 

Josiah Sr. willed to Solomon the 160 acres in 1756—the deed of gift was in 1751.

Josiah Harrell Jr. (b. c. 1750)

 

            Josiah Jr. inherited the parcel of land and plantation on which his parents were living in 1773. After his mother’s death, Josiah Jr. inherited the plantation according to his father’s 1773 will. This was not the 160 acres his father had inherited in 1756 so must have been the approximately 70 acres his father received from his brother, David, in 1751. 

 

            On May 27, 1780, Josiah Jr. sold about 75 acres to his cousin, Israel Hardy Harrell, for $1000. This was probably not the land and plantation left to him by his father in the latter’s 1773 will—it was more than likely the land Josiah Sr. got from his brother, David, in 1751. There is also a deed for the sale of 160 acres to Israel Hardy Harrell, Josiah’s cousin. This was for the sale of land inherited by their cousin, Esias Jr.—his share of their grandfather, John Jr./Sr.’s, property.[39] How Josiah Jr. ended up making the sale and giving title to their cousin, Israel Hardy Harrell, is beyond me. Josiah may have been exercising an extended family responsibility on this occasion, because there is no record indicating he ever owned one of the 160 acre shares from his grandfather, John Jr./Senior.

 

            After Josiah sold his inherited land in Bertie County, it is difficult to track him with much certainty. As I have indicated in the previous chapter, a family history written by Hollowell traces her family line from Josiah Harrell of Gates County—the participant in the American Revolutionary War. Josiah of Gates County married Julia Fryer there in 1788, raised his family there, and his will was probated in Gates County in February 1825. Hollowell claims Josiah of Gates was the son of Josiah Sr. of Bertie County.[40] She may well be correct, but I have not been able to find evidence to support the connection. The problem is, of course, there was more than one Josiah Harrell in the Bertie/Gates area during the time. The following list illustrates Josiah Harrell’s presence in both Bertie and Gates Counties during the mid and late 1700s.

 [page 64]

The Presence of Josiah Harrell[41]

 

         In Bertie County                              In Gates area & County

 

1755-1761 tax list  yes

1769 tax list                            yes                          1768-1770 tax list (Hertford)                yes

1781 tax list: Josiah Sr.         yes                          1781 tax list                                            no

                       Josiah Jr.        yes

1787 state census                 yes                          1786 state census                                 yes

                                                1 male 16-60                                                                           1 male 16-60

                                                2 females                                                                                3 males under 16

                                                                                                                                                3 females

1790 census                          yes                          1790 census                                          yes

                                                1 male over 16                                                                       1 male over 16

                                                                                                                                                1 male under 16

                                                                                                                                                3 females

           

The will for Josiah Harrell Jr. was written August 20, 1783, and probated at the November Term of 1783. He named his daughters Fanny and Anna Harrell. The executors were Bailus House, and Noah Thompson. The witnesses were George House, Noah Harrell and Noah Hinton.[42] Two of the witnesses suggest a connection to the descendants of John Jr./Senior. Noah Harrell was a son of David (deceased 1767), and thus a first cousin to Josiah Junior. Noah’s other first cousin, also named Josiah, the son of Uncle Jesse, was still alive in 1786, so he was not the subject of the 1783 will. Noah Hinton was a witness or executor on most of this family’s wills.

 

William Harrell (b. c. 1755)

 

            Josiah Sr. and Ann Harrell’s son, William, was named in his father’s will but apparently did not receive any land.

 

Selah Harrell (b. c. 1755)

 

Selah, the daughter of Josiah Sr., did not marry. Her will was written on May 13, 1783, and probated at the November Term of 1783. She named her sister, Penny Harrell, her brother, William Harrell, George Williams, and Lewis Bryant. Her sister, Penny Harrell, and James House were executors. The witnesses were James House, and Sarah House.[43]

Pennie Harrell (b. c. 1755)

 [page 65]

Ezechiel Harrell (b. c. 1730-died 1764)

 

            John Jr./Sr. and Grace Harrell’s son, Ezechiel, inherited his 160 acre share of the land his father had purchased from Thomas Barker—it was the plantation he was already living on when his father wrote his will in 1756. His father also left him 50 acres at the head of “Jumping Run.”[44]

 

On April 11, 1764, Ezechiel wrote his will in Bertie County. He identified his wife, Alee; his son, Israel Hardy Harrell; and his daughter, Grace Harrell. According to his son, Israel Hardy’s, will in 1780, Israel had the following sisters: Grace Pierce, Patience, Esther, Edith, Keziah, and Delilah Owens. The executors named in his will were Noah Hinton, and his brothers Jesse and Josiah Harrell.[45]

Ezechiel and Alie Harrell’s Children

 

Israel Hardy Harrell (d. 1783)

 

            Israel Hardy was named for his uncle, “Hardy,” who died in 1756. He bought about 75 acres from his cousin, Josiah Jr., for $1000 on May 27, 1780.[46] This was probably the land and plantation left to Josiah Jr. by his father which was probably the land Josiah Sr. got from his brother, David, in 1751.

 

            Then on March 9, 1782, Israel Hardy Harrell bought 160 acres from his cousin, Josiah Junior. These were the 160 acres that had been inherited by Esais from John Harrell Jr./Sr. back in 1756.[47] This deed was presented at the February Term on the 1783 Court.

 

Israel wrote his will on August 3, 1780—it was presented at the May Term of the 1783 Court. In the will he named his mother, Alice Owens, and sisters, Grace Pierce, Patience, Esther, Edith, and Delilia. The executors for his will were Noah Hinton, Josiah Harrell Jr. and Jesse Harrell. Josiah Harrell was a witness.[48] Josiah Jr. was Israel’s first cousin, Jesse and Josiah Harrell were his uncles. Noah Hinton was an executor on a number of wills for this line of Harrell.

 

Nothing is known at this time about Ezechiel and Alie Harrell’s daughters except their names as listed in their brother’s 1780 will.

 

Grace Harrell Pierce
Patience Harrell
Esther Harrell
Edith Harrell
Delilah Harrell Owens

 [page 66]

Jesse Harrell Sr. (b. c. 1730)

 

            John Jr./Sr. and Grace Harrell’s son, Jesse, inherited the plantation his parents were living on at the time of his father’s 1756 will. He also received, as did his brothers, 70 acres from his brother, David, around 1751.[49]

 

            Jesse wrote his will on September 19, 1786, and it was exhibited at the February Term, 1788. He named the following members of his family: his wife, Fereby; his daughters Priscilla Vinson and Rachel Rascoe; and sons, Josiah, Jesse, Joshua, and Jonathan. The executors for his will were sons, Josiah, Joshua, and Jonathan, and the witnesses were Noah Hinton, Noah Harrell, and Robert Adams.[50] According to the will, Jesse and Fereby’s children were as follows.

 

Josiah Harrell (b. c. 1755)

 

            Josiah married Mary Ann Gardner on December 13, 1777 in Bertie County; or he married Sarah Harrell (House?) on September 21, 1778. Josiah was still alive in 1786 when he was named an executor in his father’s will.

Priscilla Harrell Vinson (b. c. 1755)

 

            Jesse identified his daughter, Priscilla Vinson, and her daughter, Rachel Kittrell, in his will, but I have not found a marriage record for her.

 

Rachel Kitrell Harrell (b. c. 1774)

 

            The Rachel Kitrell who married Jesse Harrell on November 11, 1794 in Bertie County may have been Jesse Harrell’s granddaughter.

 

Ferebee Harrell Roundtree (b. c. 1755)

 

            Jesse and Fereby’s daughter, Ferebee, married Obed. Roundtree on February 11, 1771 in Bertie County. In his will Jesse identified his two grandchildren, Judith and Joab Roundtree.

 [page 67]

  

Jesse Harrell Jr. (b. c. 1755)

 

            Jesse Sr. also identified his son, Jesse, and his children, Turner, Tempe, and Jesse Harrell—the latter would have been Jesse III.

 

Turner Harrell (b. c. 1780)
Tempe Harrell (b. c. 1780)
Jesse Harrell III (b. c. 1780)

 

Joshua Harrell (b. c. 1755)

 

            The following may have been the will of Jesse Sr.’s son. The timing is right, and he uses two names common to this family—Jesse and Josiah. A Joshua Harrell wrote his will on June 26, 1810 in Bertie County. It was probated at the August Term of the 1810 Court.[51] He named the following members of his family.

 

Jesse Bryan Harrell
Josiah Harrell (born before 1789)
Elisha Harrell

 

Rachel Harrell Rascoe (b. c. 1755)

               

            Jesse and Fereby Harrell’s daughter, Rachel, married William Rasco on December 13, 1777 in Bertie County. They had a daughter, Ferebee Rascoe, according to Rachel’s father’s will of 1786.

Jonathan Harrell (b. c. 1755)

 

Esias Harrell (b. c. 1730; died before 1756)

 

            When John Harrell Jr./Sr. wrote his will in November of 1756, his son, Esias, was already dead. Consequently, he left Esias’ 160 acre share to his grandson, Esais Junior. Esais Jr. was living on the farm with his mother and step-father, Jonathan Spivey, at the time the will was written.

 [page 68]

 

Esais Harrell Jr. (b. c. 1755)

 

            An Esias Harrell of Nansemond County, Virginia married Christian Roundtree in Gates County, North Carolina on September 29, 1780. This may have been the Esias Jr. from Bertie County, whose parents were probably born in Nansemond County.

 

            Somehow, on March 9, 1782, Esais Jr.’s cousin, Josiah Jr., sold the 160 acres that was inherited by Esais from John Harrell Jr./Sr. back in 1756 to their cousin, Israel Hardy Harrell, son of Ezechiel.[52] (At one point in the deed, the reference is to “Hardy” Harrell which was the name used by their uncle, also named Israel Hardy Harrell.) 

 

Israel Hardy “Hardy” Harrell (b. c. 1730)

 

            On May 13, 1751, John Harrell Jr./Sr., executed a deed of gift to his sons, David, Elisas, Josiah, and Ezekial Harrell. The deed of gift divided 640 acres on Runnerry Marshes. “… unto my fore sons…. I likewise give and grant unto my son Israel Hardy Harrell the Plantation whereon I now live and dwell… after my Decease and the Decease of his Mother (120 a.) … I likewise give unto … Ezekial and Israel Hardy Harrell 100 acres of land neigh the head of Jumping Run 50 acres apiece after our decease to them….”[53]

 

            Hardy was one of the executors in his brother’s, John Jr.’s, will and was present when it was exhibited in the January Court, 1756. However, there was no mention of Hardy when his father’s will was written on November 1, 1756. I assume he died sometime between those two dates, and had no children—but he may have just left the state.

 

Sarah Harrell Williams (b. c. 1730; died before 1756)

 

John Harrell Jr. (b. c. 1710-died 1756)

 

            As near as I can tell, the first deed witnessed by John Jr. was in December 1729—which meant he was probably born around 1710 in Nansemond County, Virginia. That would have made him John Jr./Sr. and Grace’s oldest son. John Jr. married Mary Williams.[54]

 

            John Jr. may have settled in Northampton County, North Carolina for a while because he owned a large plantation and other lands in that county which he and his wife began to sell in 1743. On February 2, 1743, John Harrell Jr. and his wife, Mary, of Bertie County sold a 350 acre plantation to John Hilliard of Northampton County—the land was part of a patent granted to George Williams in 1721. It was adjoining other lands still owned by John Harrell.[55]

[page 69] 

            On March 25, 1749, John Jr. got a land grant from the Earl of Granville for 200 acres in Bertie County. Later, in 1756, John Jr.’s son, George, identified this 1749 grant when he sold some of the land. [56]

 

            Later that year, on September 27, 1749, John Jr. bought 640 acres (for 6 lbs.) on the north side of the Roanoke River, “… being a patten formerly granted to Richard Melton bearing date April 6, 1722….” The land was adjacent to George Williams and Ben. Foreman. (Abraham’s grandson, John Jr. was not born yet, so this was John Jr./Sr.’s son.) It is interesting to note that this land in Bertie County was adjacent to George Williams—the same person from whom John Jr. and Mary had originally bought the Northampton County land that they sold in 1743. Then on February 7, 1754, John Harrell Jr. sold 200 acres to Samuel Andrews. The land was adjacent to John Roades, James Brown, Nicholas Skinner, and John Rutland. A witness to the deed was John Harrell.[57]

 

            In his 1755 will, John Jr. dispersed the land purchased on September 27, 1749 and his other property to his children. The will is dated November 8, 1755, and in it John Jr. identified his wife, Mary; his sons, George, Elisha, Jesse, and Benjamin; and daughter, Mary. His son, George, and his brothers, Jesse and Israel Hardy Harrell were the executors. The will was probated in the January Court, 1756.[58] John Jr. had acquired considerable wealth which was distributed among his heirs. His land holdings were given to his sons as follows:

 

To son George, 135 acres near places called “Rhodes hogg Pen” and “Burks branch.”

To sons George, Jesse, Elisha, and Benjamin, 100 acres near a place called “Conaquina Swamp.” This land was to be divided equally as they come of age.

To sons Jesse, Elisha and Benjamin, 775 acres—Jesse got 220 acres near places called “Willow branch” and “Saw Scaffold;” Elisha got 220 acres near places called “Mill branch” and “John Skinners Spring;” Benjamin got 335 acres which included the Plantation on which John Jr. was then living, plus all adjoining lands that had not been given to other sons.

To all four sons, got his Mill and all adjoining lands.

 

John Jr. and Mary Harrell’s Children:

 

            Because John Jr.’s will suggests his children were not all yet of age in 1755, I am estimating their birth years to cluster between 1735 and 1740.

George (b. c. 1735)

 

            On October 15, 1756, George Harrell sold 100 acres to John Harrell on the north side of the Roanoke River. Part of a grant to John Harrell Jr. back on March 25, 1749. The land is adjacent to William Andrews, and the deed was witnessed by Jesse Harrell, Hardy Harrell, and probated at the January Court of 1757.[59] In this deed, George was apparently selling some or all of the land he inherited from his father, John Jr., to another John Harrell—George’s father, John Jr., was already deceased, and George did not have a brother named John. The witnesses were George’s brother, Jesse, and his uncle, Hardy (Israel Hardy Harrell).

[page 70]

Jesse (b. c. 1744)

 

            Like his brothers, Jesse inherited about 200 acres according to his father’s 1756 will.

 

            This Jesse Harrell had an uncle, Jesse Sr., and a cousin, Jesse Jr., both of whom lived nearby. Some of the information I have included in the sections above for his uncle and cousin may belong here. In age, Jesse, son of John Jr., was probably between the ages of Jesse Sr. and Junior.

 

            Jesse and his wife, Olive, moved to Robeson County, and they had seven children. They were: Hezekiah, Jesse Jr., Skinner, Druscilla, Elizabeth, Sarah, and David.

 

Elisha (b. c. 1749)

           

            Elisha also inherited land from his father, John Jr., around 1756, but that did not hold him to the area. He also moved to Robeson County; and he and his wife, Pherby Fort, had seven children. They include: John Harrell (b. c. 1785), Hardy H. Harrell[60] (b. c. 1790), Elisha Harrell Jr., and James Fort Harrell.

Benjamin (b. c. 1740, d. 1775)

 

            Benjamin was a son of John Jr., and he inherited the family farm on which his parents were living at the time his father’s will was written in 1755.

 

            Benjamin Harrell’s will was written on July 11, 1775, and exhibited at the August Court, 1775. In his will he identified his “son John, Charles Yeates Harrell, brother Elisha Harrell, wife Winney, Lemuel Harrell and Wm. Andrews  Exrs….” The witnesses included Dempsey Harrell.[61]

 

Benjamin and Winney Harrell’s Children

 

John Harrell, son of Benjamin (b. c. 1760)

 

Charles Yeates Harrell, son of Benjamin (b. c. 1760)

 [page 71]

  

Mary Harrell (b. c. 1740)

 

            I have not found marriage information or any other recorded document for John Jr. and Mary Harrell’s daughter, Mary.

 

Abraham Harrell  (born c. 1690; died 1755)

 

            One of the family researchers discussed in chapter 1, Elizabeth J. “Betty” Harrell Gerlack, concluded that Abraham was a son of Thomas of Nansemond.[62] An accompanying conclusion, by inference, would be that Abraham was the brother of  Orrin F. Harrell’s Samuel I of the Gates area. I think, however, it is just as likely Abraham was John of Nansemond’s son. My only bases for suggesting this connection is the mutual support and interaction evident among the Harrells in southern Bertie County as seen in the recorded property deeds in the area.

 

            Abraham first appeared in Bertie County documents when he was a witness to John of Nansemond’s purchase of land on the Roanoke River in May of 1729. The land was adjacent to John Harrell (probably John Jr./Sr.). The deed was witnessed by Joseph and Abraham Harrell. Three months later, Abraham bought 100 acres in southern Bertie County from Joseph Harrell, probably his brother. Abraham bought an additional 150 acres near his place in 1733—adjacent to James Parker, Owen O. Daniell, and William Eason. John and John Jr. Harrell witnessed the deed.[63] These deeds put Joseph, Abraham and John Jr./Sr. all in southern Bertie County by 1729. Their probable father, John of Nansemond, may have paid them a visit, and made the May 1729 purchase while in the area.

 

     Abraham Harrell’s will was probated in Bertie County in May of 1755. In his will he provided for his wife, Mary, as well as his sons and daughters. Abraham’s sons, Able and John, were executors for his estate. One of the witnesses was Israel Hardy Harrell, son of John Jr./Sr., which, based on my assumptions, would make him Abraham’s nephew. A receipt was filed by John Harrell, executor to Abraham’s estate at the Bertie County Court in September 1768. It was signed by Abraham’s heirs: Able Harrell, Mary Hubbard, Abigail Harrell, Lott Harrell, Theophilus Tooll, Susanna and Christopher Harrell.[64]

 

Abraham and Mary Harrell’s Descendants

 

Mary Harrell Holland Toole, daughter of Abraham (b. c. 1722)

 

     Abraham and Mary’s daughter, Mary, had one son, Frederick, from her marriage to Mr. Holland. She may have had more children with her second husband, Edward Toole. Mary Holland married Edward Toole in Bertie County on September 26, 1764. Edward Toole’s estate provided for Jerald, Jonathan, David, Edward, and Isaac Toole; and possibly a daughter, Mrs. Joseph Turner.

 [page 72]

Frederick Holland (b. c. 1760)

 

            Frederick Holland married Grace Cole in Bertie County on January 9, 1792.

 

Able Harrell, son of Abraham (c. 1724-c. 1778)

 

            Able owned land and was on the Bertie County tax list for 1763. He moved to Martin County around 1767. Able had four sons: Noah, Joel, Hampton, and Lewis.

 

Noah Harrell (born around 1752)

 

            Noah moved to Georgia around 1778.

Joel Harrell (born around 1755)

 

            A Joel Harrell married Coela Goff in Bertie County on April 20, 1779. He was listed as living adjacent to Henry Harrell’s sons, John Wimberly, Benjamin, Henry Jr., and Reuben in 1785.[65] Joel apparently moved to Martin County in the early 1790s.

Hampton Harrell (born around 1758)

 

Hampton apparently also moved to Martin County in the early 1790s.

 

Lewis Harrell (born around 1760)

 

Lewis stayed in Bertie County where he died in 1798, and he apparently had descendants who stayed in the area. I have not connected him, however, to the other Harrells in Bertie County. His estate was administered by Charity Harrell in 1798.

 

John Harrell, son of Abraham (b. c. 1726-1777)

 

Abraham left his manor plantation to his son, John (c. 1726-1777), in his 1755 will. John was about 24 years old at the time, and should have appeared on the Bertie County tax lists from 1756 until around 1777, the year of his death. As we saw from the Bertie County Tax Lists, 1755-1761 (see Table 5 on page 26), there were always more than enough John Harrells to maintain a certain level of uncertainty for the researcher. Nonetheless, the John Harrell who made his first appearance on Brickell’s tax list in 1756 was probably Abraham’s son. Brickell was the Sheriff, and his list was not necessarily confined to a [page 73] geographic tax district as were most of the others. John was the only Harrell on Brickell’s list that year, even though he lived in an area with many other Harrell households—this may have been because of the probate situation concerning the plantation John just inherited from his father, Abraham, in the 1755 will.

 

In any case, if the John Harrell on Brickell’s tax list in 1756 was indeed Abraham’s son, then his son, John, had three taxable people with him from 1756 through 1760. His brother, Lott, had left for Edgecombe County to farm the land he inherited from his father-in-law in 1748, and their youngest brother, Christopher, was only 12 years old in 1756, thus not yet taxable. So the three taxable people on the family farm in 1756 were probably Able, around the age of 32, John, around the age of 30, and Zachariah who was around the age of 18. By the 1758 tax list, I believe Abraham’s son, John, was the person referred to as “John Harrell of Roanoke.” (John Jr./Sr. and his son, John Jr. were gone from the lists by 1758.) In fact, the John Harrell listed on the line just below John of Roanoke in Table 5, was probably also John of Roanoke. If that is the case, Abraham’s son, John, would have been down to one taxable person in his household by 1761 when he appeared on Vance’s tax list. Apparently John’s brothers, Able and Zachariah, were off on their own by 1761. For instance, by that time Able was around 37 years of age, married and with four children of his own.

 

John’s will was proved in the February Court of Bertie County in 1777. In his will he identified his wife, Ann, as administrator of his estate; and provided for their sons, Zachariah, John, Lott, “Gimmy” James; and their daughters, Mary and Elizabeth. John Sr.’s brother, Lott, was an executor of his will.[66]

  

John and Ann Harrell’s Descendants

  

Mary Harrell Harrell (b. c. 1761)

 

John and Ann’s daughter, Mary (born around 1761), married Jesse Harrell before 1784. Their son, Zachariah, may have moved to Martin County by 1784 to be near his Uncle Lott.

Zachariah Harrell (b. c. 1763)

 

            Zachariah was still under age in 1783—his guardian was Jesse Cotton at the time. He did not inherit land and may also have moved to Martin County near his Uncle Lott. 

John Harrell Jr., grandson of Abraham (b. c. 1765)

 

John Jr. was not yet of age when his father died in 1777, but he was designated to inherit the family farm when he came of age. The North Carolina State Census included a list of inhabitants of Captain Solomon Freeman’s District of Bertie County in 1787.[67] It shows only one John Harrell—a John Jr. whose household included one white male age 21-60; two white males under 21 or over 60 years old; and four white females of any age. If this John Jr. was the son of John and Ann, then he would have been around 22 years of age. He may have had two sons and three daughters under the age of 21, but that seems unlikely given his young age at the time. It is more likely he and his wife had one or two of their parents living with them who were over the age of 60.

[page 74]

John Jr., grandson of Abraham, and his wife, Elizabeth, sold the family farm on December 24, 1795. They sold the 150 acres adjacent to James Parker, OEN Odaniells [Owen], and William Esaon—this was the land purchased by Abraham on August 3, 1733, and willed to his son, John Sr., in 1755, who in turn willed it to his son, John Jr., in 1777.[68]

Lott Harrell (b. c. 1770)

 

John and Ann’s son, Lott may also have moved to Martin County to be near his uncle Lott.

James “Jimmy” Harrell (b. c. 1775)

 

Jimmy James lived with Ann and John Gardner, his guardian, for several years—perhaps from about 1783 through 1792. I have not seen any evidence to indicate what became of him.

Elizabeth Harrell

 

Abigail Harrell, daughter of Abraham (b. c. 1728)

 

Sarah Harrell Neal, daughter of Abraham (b. c. 1730)

 

Sarah was married to Thomas Neal, and she reportedly was no longer in the county by 1768.

Lott Harrell, son of Abraham (b. c. 1732)

 

            Lott inherited a portion of his grandfather’s farm (on his mother’s side) in a part of Edgecombe County that would later become part of Martin County. He apparently moved there as a young man. His brother, Able, joined him there in the mid-1770s, and several of his brothers’ children lived with him for a while. The North Carolina State Census for Martin County, taken in 1787, shows Lott and Zachariah Harrell next to each other. Lott’s household has:[69]

 

            1, white male age 21-60

            4, white males under 21 or over 60

            6, white females of any age

            4, blacks age 12-50

            9, blacks under 12 or above 50

 

            Not much is known about Lott’s children at this time, and there is no way of telling if any of them ended up in Hertford County—it does not seem too likely, however.

[page 75]

Grace Harrell Holland, daughter of Abraham (b. c. 1735-d. 1761-1768)

 

            Grace married Theophilus Holland, and they had at least two children. By 1775, their sons, Theophilus (born around 1756) and Henry (born around 1758) were orphans—William Adams was their guardian. The State Census of 1787 does not show Theophilus or Henry Holland in either Bertie or Martin Counties.

 

Grace and Theophilus Holland’s Children

 

Theophilus Holland Jr. (b. c. 1756)
Henry Holland (b. c. 1758)

 

Zachariah Harrell, son of Abraham (b. c. 1738)

 

            Zachariah married Martha Everitt of Edgecombe County in 1764. They were in Martin County next to brother Lott for the 1787 State Census—it shows Zachariah and Martha, and one other female, probably a daughter.

 

Susanna Harrell, daughter of Abraham (b. c. 1742)

Christopher Harrell, son of Abraham (b. c. 1744-1772)

 

Like his brothers, Lott and Zachariah, Christopher spent time in Martin County. Christopher, however, sold his inheritance in Martin County in 1768 and returned to Bertie County.

 

Christopher Harrell’s will was written March 24, 1772, and probated in Bertie County. He named his wife, and no other Harrells appear in the document.[70]

 

Edward Harrell (b. before 1686-1754)

 

            Edward Harrell married Margaret Brumwell on April 20, 1707 in Middlesex, Virginia. If he married in 1707, then he was probably born before 1686. He was referred to as Edward of Nansemond County, and was probably one of the original Harrell Brothers from that area of Virginia.

 

On December 20, 1729, Edward Harrell of Nansemond County bought 350 acres from William Eason on the southeast side of Unerry [?] Swamp. The property was adjacent to Owen Daniels, James Smith, William Eason, Joseph Harrell, ______ Parker. It was part of a patent granted to William Eason on Aug. 4, 1723, and of another patent granted Eason on May 1, 1721, and part of a deed of sale of  James Parker dated July 12, 1722. The witnesses were John Harrell, John Harrell (probably John Jr./Sr. and Jr.), Grace Harrell (John Jr./Sr.’s wife).[71] This property was just above the Roanoke River, in the same area as Joseph, Abraham, and John Harrell.

 [page 76]

Edward was still in Bertie County six years later, when on May 12, 1735, John Harill, Joseph Harrill, Edward Harrill all witnessed a deed for a neighbor on the north side of the Roanoke River.[72] This was a common sight, which further suggests these probable brothers lived in and as a community.

 

During the following 15 years, Edward accumulated considerable land holdings. For instance, on December 24, 1737, Edward Harrell bought himself a Christmas present of 260 acres from James Brown. They were “in the fork between the South and Middle Branch of the Cashy at the neck where the two branches meet.” The land was adjacent to Thomas Mann, and the witnesses on the deed were, John Harrell, Francis Parker. In addition, on March 5, 1749, Edward bought 190 acres more from the Earl of Granville for 3 shillings. This land was on the northeast side of the Cashy Swamp, adjacent to George Burnette The low cost of the land carried the usual conditions for settling the land and increasing the tax base in the area. For instance, Edward was required to  “… cultivate at rate of 3 acres for every 100 a…. within 21 years. Clear and cultivate the premises after the rate of 21 a. for every 100 a. … erect a good dwelling house… stock cattle thereon at rate of 5 for every 100 a….” Then on October 6, 1750, Edward bought more land—this purchase was for 330 acres from Samuel Page. The land was also in Cashey Swamp, adjacent to James Blunt, Samuel Page, and Ed. Harrell. The land had been formerly granted to Henry Rodes in 1723. The witnesses were Tom Page and John Harrell.[73]

 

From the Bertie County tax lists (see Table 5, page 27), we know Edward had sons Henry, Joshua, and Thomas. Additional information about his family was provided in the will he wrote on August 17, 1752. In his will he identified his sons Henry, Jarusha [Joshua], and Thomas; his daughter, Mary Andrews; and his grandchildren, Jesse Harrell and Rebecca Sharpe. Edward’s son, Henry, was an executor along with his son-in-law, Henry Andrews.[74] Considering the names of his grandchildren, it is probably safe to assume he had a daughter who married a Sharpe, but unfortunately, we do not get a clue from the will about the parents of grandson Jesse Harrell. Perhaps these two grandchildren were named in the will because their parent, child of Edward, had died by 1752. Son, Henry, had at least one, perhaps two, sons by the time the will was written.

 

Edward’s will was written on August 12, 1752, and probated in the May Court of 1754 in Bertie County. There are no records of Edward selling or giving title to his lands, so it is a pretty good bet he passed it on to his sons. His children were as follows.

Edward Harrell’s Children

 

            I believe Edward’s middle child was born around 1715; their names were as follows:

           

                Henry Harrell                        born c. 1715

                Joshua Harrell                       born c. 1715

                Thomas Harrell                     born c. 1715

                Mary Harrell Andrews        born c. 1715

_____ Harrell Sharpe          born c. 1715

 [page 77]

Henry Harrell, son of Edward (b. c. 1715-1777)

 

            I assume Henry inherited land from his father at some point, because there are no Bertie County deeds showing Henry getting, or for that matter giving, title to land in the county.

 

Henry Harrell wrote his will on February 27, 1773, and it was presented at the February Court of 1777. In it he identified his sons, Reuben, Benjamin, Henry, Whitmell, John Wimberley Harrell, and sons, David, Joseph, and Edward; daughter, Pharaby Pulle, and daughters, Rachel, Barbara, and Elizabeth; and his wife Rachel. His wife, Rachel, and sons, Reuben and Benjamin were the executors, and Jacob Harrell was among the witnesses.[75]

 

Henry and Rachel Harrell’s Children

 

            I have made a very rough estimate of their children’s ages, simply for the purpose of marking their generation—the names and estimates of birth years are as follows:

 

                Reuben Harrell                      born c. 1750

                Benjamin Harrell                   born c. 1750

                Henry Harrell                        born c. 1750

                Whitmell Harrell                   born c. 1750

                John Wimberly Harrell        born c. 1750

                David Harrell                         born c. 1755

                Joseph Harrell                       born c. 1755

                Edward Harrell                      born c. 1755

                Pharaby Pulle Harrell           born c. 1755

                Rachel Harrell                       born c. 1755

                Barbara Harrell                      born c. 1755

                Elizabeth Harrell                   born c. 1755

 

            I have listed Pharaby as if Pulle were her middle name. It might have been her married name, however. She was listed in her father’s will as Pharaby Pulle in a statement separate from the list of his other daughters—but I did not find a record of her marriage to a Pulle, nor did I find any other Pulle families in Bertie County.

Reuben Harrell (b. c. 1750; died after 1809)

 

Reuben was mentioned in a deed between his brothers, John and Benjamin, in 1785. It suggests he was at that time still on land he had inherited from his father.[76] He was not in Bertie or Gates County for the 1787 State census nor the 1790 Federal census. Yet on June 30, 1809, Reuben’s brother, Benjamin, named him as an executor in his will.

[page 78] 

Benjamin Harrell (b. c. 1750; died 1809)

 

            About two years after his father died, Benjamin Harrill married Jemima Powill in Bertie County on March 23, 1775.

 

On October 13, 1785, Benjamin bought 12 acres from his brother, John Wimberly—it was John’s rights to land they inherited from their then deceased brother, Whitmell Harrell. On that same day, October 13, 1785, Benjamin bought 50 acres from his brother, John Wimberly—it was also land inherited from their father, Henry, in 1773.[77]

 

Benjamin Harrell wrote his will on June 30, 1809, and it was probated at the November Term of the 1809 Court. In his will he identified his sons, George, Henry and Powell; his daughters, Rachel Harrell, Celia Carney and Winnefred Carney; his grand-son, Right Harrell; and his mother-in-law, Ann Powell. His wife, Jemima, brother, Reuben, and son, Henry were named as executors in the will. Benjamin’s wife, Jemima Powell’s will was written on September 19, 1822, and probated in the August Term of 1826. In her will, she named her daughters, Rachel, Winnefred, and Celia; and her son, Henry, as executor; the witness was Mary Harrell.[78]

 

Benjamin and Jemima Harrell’s Children

 

George Harrell (b. before 1790)
Henry Harrell (b. before 1788)

 

            Henry was an executor on his father’s will in 1809, so he was more than likely born before 1788. He was also an executor on his mother’s will in 1826.

Powell Harrell ( b. before 1790; died 1837)

 

            According to his 1837 will, Powell had two children with his first wife, Celia Willoughby—they were Ann P. Harrell and John P. Harrell.

 

In his will, he also identified his second wife, Harriet—Powell Harrell married Harriet Rice in Bertie County on May 3, 1834. He also names two children from his second marriage—they were Mary P. Harrell and Powell A. Harrell. His children were all probably under age when his will was probated at the August Term of the 1837 Court.[79]

 

            Around 1843, Powell’s second wife, Harriet, married Absolom Rodgers. The 1850 census indicates Harriet probably had five children by her second marriage. Her youngest son, Powell H. Harrell, from her first marriage was living with her and her new family—Powell H. Harrell was 13 years of age in 1850.

 [page 79]

Ann P. Harrell

 

John P. Harrell (b. c. 1817)

 

            There was a John P. Harrell in Hertford County for the 1850 census—he was 33 years old at the time. That indicates he had a birth year of around 1817. Powell Harrell was born before 1790 so would have been over 27 years of age when the Hertford County John P. Harrell was born. This is a very good possibility—John P. Harrell was in the censuses for Hertford County in 1840 and 1850. He was gone by 1860. For more details on Edward’s descendant, John P. Harrell and family, see chapter 12 below on “Immigrants to The 4th Generation of Hertford County Harrells.”

 

Mary P. Harrell (b. 1835)

 

Powell A./H. Harrell (born 1837)

 

            Powell Jr. was still living with his mother and step-father, Absolom Rodgers, in Bertie County for the 1850 census—he was 13 years old at the time.

 

Rachel Harrell

 

Winnefred Harrell

 

Celia Harrell

 

Henry Harrell Jr. (b. c. 1750)

 

According to the deed of 1785, in which Henry’s brother, John Wimberly Harrell, sold land to their brother, Benjamin, Henry was still living in the area at that time.[80]

 

Whitmell Harrell (b. c. 1750-1785)

 

            In the deed cited in the previous paragraph, dated October 13, 1785, Whitmell’s brother, John Wimberly, sold 12 acres to their brother, Benjamin. John was selling his rights to the land of their then deceased brother, Whitmell Harrell. Whitmell died in his mid-thirties and I have not found a record of a marriage for him.

 [page 80]

John Wimberly Harrell (b. c. 1750)

 

On October 13, 1785, John Wimberly Harrell sold 50 acres of the land he inherited from his father, Henry, to Benjamin Harrell. The land was adjacent to John and Benjamin’s brothers, Henry and Ruben Harrell, as well as Joel Harrell. (Joel was probably Able’s son, and Abraham’s grandson.) They all lived down around Cashie Branch in southern Bertie County. John Wimberly Harrell entered into a mortgage contract with John Rutland on February 15, 1793 in Bertie County.[81]

 

David Harrell (b. c. 1755)

 

            David married Celia Moor in Bertie County on May 10, 1777—he died less than two years later. David’s will was dated May 24, 1778, and probated in the May Court of 1779. In his will, he identified his wife, Celia, but no children. The witnesses were Arthur Thompson, Edea Moore, and Charity Vann.[82]

Joseph Harrell (b. c. 1755)

 

Edward Harrell (b. c. 1755)

 

Pharaby Pulle Harrell (b. c. 1755)

 

            A women named Pheribe Harrell married Obed. Roundtree on February 11, 1771, in Bertie County—could Pulle have been her middle name? I have not found any Pulle families in Bertie County.

 

Rachel Harrell (b. c. 1755)

 

            A Rachel Harrel married William Rasco in Bertie County on December 13, 1777.

 

Barbara Harrell (b. c. 1755)

 

            Barbara Harrel married Joseph Horne in Bertie County on April 18, 1778.

 

Elizabeth Harrell (b. c. 1755)

 

            An Elizabeth Harrel married John Dodrill in Bertie County on May 1, 1778. And an Elizabeth Harrel married William Wimberly in Bertie County on January 9, 1783.

 [page 81]

Joshua Harrell, son of Edward (b. c. 1715)

 

There is a will for a Joshua Harrell dated January 23, 1780, and probated at the November Term of the 1789 Court in Bertie County. Joshua names his wife, Ann; children, Christopher, Catherine, Ann, Hodges, Elizabeth, Wynnah, Josiah, Hezekiah, and Jeremiah. The witnesses were John Holland, Jewel Holland, and Allen Harrell.[83]

 

Josuah and Ann Harrell’s Children

 

Christopher Harrell

Catherine Harrell

Ann Harrell

Hodges Harrell

Elizabeth Harrell

Wynnah Harrell

Josiah Harrell

Hezekiah Harrell

 

            Hezexiah Harrell’s will was probated in Bertie County in the November 1801 Court. He named Ann Harrell and his brothers and sisters.[84]

Jeremiah Harrell

 

Thomas Harrell, son of Edward (b. c. 1715; died 1791)

 

As pointed out above, according to the tax lists of the mid-1750s, there were at least three Thomas Harrells in Bertie County at that time. Only one of them was identified as the son of Edward Harrell, however (see Table 5, page 26). By the 1787 State Census, there was only one Thomas Harrell in Bertie County—in addition to Thomas, his household consisted of one white male under 20 years of age, and two white females.

 

The Thomas in the State Census was certainly the Thomas Harrell whose will was presented to the Court in the August Term 1791. His will was written on September 15, 1786, and presented in the [page 82] August Term 1791. This may have been the will of Edward Harrell’s son, Thomas (b. c. 1715). It was probably not the will of the original Thomas who first bought land in Bertie County on May 2, 1721. However, if the original Thomas had a son named Thomas, this could just as well have been his will. The will specifies the following: Thomas’ wife was named Angelica; his eldest son was John, and his youngest son was Joseph; his daughters were Elenor Jordan and Mary Lassiter; his wife and son Joseph were executors, and Herbert Pritchard, Isaac Harrell, and Patience Harrell were witnesses.[85]

 

Thomas and Angelica Harrell’s Children

 

John Harrell

Joseph Harrell

Elenor Jordon

Mary Lassiter

 

Mary Harrell Andrews, daughter of Edward (b. c. 1715)

 

            Mary’s father, Edward, wrote his will in 1752, and at that time he referred to his daughter, Mary Andrews, and his son-in-law, Henry Andrews—it is probably safe to assume Mary married Henry.

 

George Harrell (A possible son of Edward)

 

            The earliest reference to George Harrell in the area is in a 1731 deed, which indicates he owned land in the area at that time. None of the early Harrells in the area identified a son named George in their wills or deeds—that, of course, does not exclude the possibility he was one of their sons who was taken care of (given land) before his father’s will was written. One such possibility is that he was the oldest son of Edward Harrell.

 

The document that places George in the area, adjacent to Edward Harrell, contains the following information: on April 4, 1731, a deed between William Eason and George House describes land on Runaroy Marsh…. Adjacent to George Harrell, Edward Harrell, John Yelverton, and James Parker.[86]

 

Francis Harrell (born before 1700)

 

            There is a short family tree that starts with Francis Harrell and descends through his son, Jacob. It claims to know that Francis was born in England in 1680, and his father was John Harrell who was born in England in 1650. The researchers who compiled this tree also state that Francis came from England to [page 83] Virginia with his father and family in 1690, and then Francis moved to Bertie County, North Carolina in 1715. When dates and places are given with such specificity, it is encouraging, but the tree does not contain a maiden name for Francis’ wife, Mary—we know her name was Mary from his 1759 will. If the researchers had access to private, family documents that give the above mentioned dates and places of birth for John and his son, Francis, one would think it also provide Mary’s maiden name. Unfortunately no documentation is provided with the family Tree.[87]

 

            Francis Harrell was buying land in North Carolina when he was still known as Francis Harrell of Upper Parish of Nansemond Co., Virginia. For instance, as early as 1721, we have the following reference: James Fayle of Upper Parish of Nansemond County, Virginia sold 100 acres of land to Francis Harrell of Upper Parish of Nansemond County. The land was northeast of Norwest Branch of Middle Swamp, Chowan County. About ten years later, he was still known by the Nansemond County distinction. A deed reads, “Francis Harrell of Nansemond County, Virginia to Richard Baker….” Francis sold 50 acres on the east side of Northwest Swamp, adjoining the lands of Richard Parker, in 1731. He also sold to Thomas Baker in 1735.[88]

 

On December 8, 1736, Francis Harrell witnessed a deed along with John Gray and Thomas Harrell, jurat. Pedegrove Salsbury bought land adjacent to William Eason. Beyond buying and selling land in southern Bertie County, the December 8, 1736 deed put Francis physically in Bertie County down around the Cashie and Roanoke Rivers at that time. About ten years later, on November 16, 1747, Francis witnessed a deed for Richard Harrell Sr. of Nansemond County, Virginia. The land was on Cashy Swamp, adjacent to the Roads Plantation at Wattom Swamp. The other witness was John Harrell.[89] As I have indicated elsewhere, there is a good probability that Richard of Nansemond and John Harrell were Francis’ brothers—or at least first cousins.

 

The property Francis bought in 1721 was not in southern Bertie County, but Francis may have settled there—his will of March 1759 was recorded in Bertie County. The will includes the following information: his wife’s name was Mary; his sons were Jacob, John and Francis; he named his daughter, Mary Averit, and daughters, Sarah Saulsbury and Elizabeth Harrell; and his other sons, William and Shadrach, as well his other daughter, Martha Harrell. His wife, and Elias Hodges were executors; and the witnesses were William Turner, William Williams, and James Churchwell.[90]

 

Francis and Mary Harrell’s Children

 

            Assuming Francis and Mary Harrell’s Children were of age in 1759 when their father’s will was written, they would all have been born before 1738. Their family should have included the following children.

 [page 84]

 

Jacob Harrell, son of Francis (b. 1716)

 

            The family tree that describes Francis and Mary Harrell’s son, Jacob, contains the following information about Jacob, his son Jacob, and his grandchildren, Rabey, Cadar, and Polly. The grandchildren were born in Bertie County, North Carolina.[91] Jacob was born in 1716 in Bertie County, and his known descendants were as follows.

 

Jacob Harrell Jr. (b. 1750)

 

            Jacob Jr. was born in 1750 in North Carolina, and he married Orpha Rabey. Their children were:

 

Rabey Harrell (b. 1787)

 

            Rabey was born on January 10, 1787 in Bertie County, North Carolina, and he married Mary (Polly) Wallace on February 23, 1812 in Sumner County, Tennessee. Rabey died on June 25, 1872 in Kentucky. Polly died on February 15, 1866 also in Kentucky.

 

Cader Harrell (b. 1790)

 

            Cader was born on January 20, 1790, and he married Polly Garrison before 1818. Cader died on July 2, 1875 in Illinois. Polly had died in the same place on September 27, 1864.

 

Polly Harrell McMurtry (b. 1793)

 

            Polly was born on March 4, 1793 in Bertie County, North Carolina, and she married Henry McMurtry around 1814 in Sumner County, Illinois. Polly died on March 9, 1855 in Illinois. Henry died on April 28, 1849 in Illinois.

 

            In addition to Jacob (b. c. 1716), Francis and Mary Harrell’s family probably included the following children:

 

John Harrell, son of Francis (b. before 1738)

 

Francis Harrell Jr. (b. before 1738)

 [page 85]

  

William Harrell, son of Francis (b. before 1738)

 

Shadrach Harrell, son of Francis (b. before 1738)

 

Mary Harrell Averit, daughter of Francis (b. before 1738)

 

Sarah Harrell Saulsbury, daughter of Francis (b. before 1738)

 

Elizabeth Harrell, daughter of Francis (b. before 1738)

 

Martha Harrell, daughter of Francis (b. before 1738)

 

Richard Harrell (born before 1673)

 

            Even though we have records of Harrells in Virginia dating back as far as the mid-1620s, the earliest record of a Harrell in the area of North Carolina reads as follows: “At a Court held at ye House of Richard Pope, Pasquotank Precinct, the 3rd. Monday in July 1694.... Edward May Clk. suit Edward Grainger vs. Rich’d Harrold.”[92] This Richard was over 21 years of age in 1694, so he would have been born before 1673, he was certainly one of the first Harrells active in North Carolina, if not the first.

 

            The Richard in the 1694 document was probably the same Richard Sr. who was settled in Perquimans County by 1728. He got a “Right of Assignment” from John Harrell of Upper Parish of Nansemond County, Virginia in 1728, and Richard Harrell Sr. was probably a brother to John of Nansemond, or perhaps his oldest son. Richard’s presence was noted in northern Bertie County on November 5, 1736. At that time, John Wynns bought 200 acres from Elizabeth Matthews which was located on the north side of the Wiccacon Creek, adjacent to Richard Harrell, Thomas Johnson, and William Baker. (This reference suggests Richard owned land in the Hertford area of Bertie County at an early date, but there is no other record of the purchase or sale.) On January 13, 1745, Richard Harrell Sr., a planter from Perquimans County sold 210 acres in Perquimans County to his son-in-law, James Scott.[93]   Then on November 16, 1747, Richard Harrell Sr. of Nansemond County bought 190 acres on Cashy Swamp, adjacent to the Roads Plantation at Wattom Swamp. John and Francis Harrell were witnesses. This located Richard among the other Harrells, just above the Roanoke River in southern Bertie County.[94]

 [page 86]

            Starting in 1753, Richard began to sell parts of a 1721 land grant he had received. He sold part to Samuel Andrews on June 5, 1753. It “…being part of a Patent bearing date March 1, 1721…” The land was located in the low grounds of the River adjacent to Marmaduke Norfleet at Upper Black Pond. A witness was John Harrell. Then on November 30, 1753, Richard Harrell sold 160 acres to John Rutland of Northampton County. It was formerly part of a patent granted to Samuel Andrews. Again, on May 3, 1755, Richard sold 110 acres to James Brown. It too was part of a patent of March 1, 1721, “… in the low ground of the river.” This land was adjacent to Harrell, Marmaduke Norfleet to creek Pond at Black Pond on Thorney Branch at Ratlands. The Witnesses were John Harrell Jr., Arthur Brown, and James Brown Junior. In this deed, Richard was selling still more of the land from his original 1721 Patent.[95]

 

            According to a March 15, 1755 deed some unrelated people were located “On Cashie Swamp adjacent to Richard Harrell on Popular Branch. This indicates Richard was still settled in the area at that time.[96] He also appeared on the Bertie County tax lists from 1757 through 1761 (see Table 5, page 26).

 

            On November 27, 1761, Richard wrote his will, and it was probated in the April Court of 1762. In the will, he names his sons, Dempsey, James and John; his grandsons Jacob and Jonathon Duke; his daughter, Martha Sheppard; his son, Richard; and his daughters, Zilpha Scott, Elizabeth Spivey, Sarah Hobbs, Ann Felton, Margaret Hill, and Mary Eason. He named his wife, Margaret, and son, John, executors. The witnesses were John Scott, James Scott, and Nicholas Stallings.[97]

 

Richard and Margaret Harrell’s Children

 

Dempsey Harrell, son of Richard

 

            Dempsey Harrell and his wife, Susannah, apparently were still living in Perquimans County in 1768. They sold their land in that county, 165 acres, on January 8, 1768.[98]

James Harrell, son of Richard (born before 1716)

 

            James bought 50 acres in Bertie County from his brother, John, in 1741.[99] This is the only record of James Harrell owning land in Bertie County—it may have been a token sale to qualify for voting rights in the county.

 

            The following will for James Harrell may be that of Richard’s son—there were no other James Harrells in the County at that time, to my knowledge. The will was written on April 2, 1781, and presented at the November Term 1785. It includes the following information: Sons, Arthur, Willis, James and Joel; daughters, Sarah, Elizabeth, Grace and Mary Harrell; grandchildren, Ephraim, Titus and Allen Page (sons of daughter Priscilla); daughter, Grace Purvis; wife, Grace; sons, James and Joel were executors, and William Higgs, Elizabeth Harrell and Mary Harrell were witnesses.[100]

 [page 87]

 

James and Grace Harrell’s Children

 

            If the above will was that of Richard’s son, James, then Richard’s grandchildren included the following. The estimates for their ages assume they were of age when their father’s will was written in 1781.

 

Arthur Harrell (b. before 1760)

 

            There is a will for an Arthur Harrell in Bertie County that was presented at the November Term 1850. If this is the same Arthur, he must have lived to around 90 years of age. He names only his daughter, Rhoda Harrell Peele and his son-in-law, Exum Peele.[101] Rhody Harrell married Exum Peale in Bertie County on November 8, 1804.

Willis Harrell (b. before 1760)

 

James Harrell Jr. (b. before 1760)

 

Joel Harrell (b, before 1760)

 

Priscilla Harrell Page (b. before 1760)

 

According to the will of Priscella’s father, written in 1781, her children included: Ephraim, Titus, and Allen Page.

 

Ephraim Page
Titus Page
Allen Page

Grace Harrell Purvis (b. before 1760)

Sarah Harrell (b. before 1760)

Elizabeth Harrell (b. before 1760)

Mary Harrell (b. before 1760)

[page 88]

John Harrell, son of Richard (b. before 1716)

 

            As I have already noted, there are so many references to John Harrells in the deeds of Bertie County, it is difficult to distinguish one from another. But one deed does stand out as one from Richard’s son, John. It was drawn in February of 1741. In that deed John named his brother, James, and as far as I have been able to determine, there was no other John Harrell with a brother named James at that time in that county except for Richard’s sons.

 

On February 4, 1741, James Harrell bought 50 acres from John Harrell—the deed includes the statement “James, brother to John Harrell.” The acres are described as follows: “…being the lower end of the Land I bought of James Brown for 200 a. more or less…” Granted by patent to Thomas Mann for 640 acres on February 1, 1725. The witnesses were Christopher Harrell and Henry Harrell (perhaps Immigrants nos. 5 and 6, in chapter 1). These 200 acres were on Cashie Swamp according to the 1738 purchase by John from James Brown.[102] This deed also establishes that John was over 21 years of age in 1738—thus born before 1717. 

 

Richard’s son, John, may have been the one who wrote his will in 1767, but that is not certain. There is a pretty good probability this is the will of Richard’s John, because I have accounted for John Jr./Sr.’s will (in 1759), and his son, John Jr.’s will (in 1756); I have also accounted for Abraham’s son, John’s will (in 1777); and for Joseph’s son, “Little John” Harrell’s will in 1781. It makes sense that this will belongs to Richard’s John Harrell, who would have been over 51 years of age when the will was written—perhaps way over that age.

 

In the will written on July 21, 1767, John Harrell named his sons Moses, Bayley, Lemuel, and Solomon; his daughters, Judah Higgs and Lucy Davenport; his sons, Amos and Gideon. His sons, Baley and Lemuel, were named as executors. The witnesses were Nicholas Skinner, Jacob Harrell, and John Higgs.[103]

 

John Harrell’s Children

 

Moses Harrell, son of John (b. c. 1735)

Bayley Harrell, son of John (b. c. 1735)

Lemuel Harrell Sr., son of John (b. c. 1735-1781)

 

            There is a will for Lemuel Harrell dated June 13, 1780, probated at the February Term of 1781. He names his wife, Mary, son, Lemuel, and four children, John, Nancy, Elijah, and Reuben Harrell, Amos Harrell (Lemuel Sr.’s brother), Thomas Rhodes and William Andrews to divide my estate after the death or marriage of my wife, Amos Harrell and Thomas Rhodes executors; witnesses were William Andrews, George Williams.[104]

 [page 89]

Lemuel and Mary Harrell’s Children
Lemuel Harrell Jr. (b. c. 1760)
John Harrell (b. c. 1760)

 

There is a will that may have been made by John Harrell, son of Lemuel Senior. On October 6, 1814, John Harrell wrote his will, and it was probated at the November Term of 1818. He identified his wife, Winnefred; his sons, Thomas, Joshua, James and Riddick Harrell; his granddaughter, Martha Harrell (daughter of Ephraim); his daughters, Ritty Hughs and Zilpha Harrell; his son John; and his other daughters, Penelope, Mary and Cynthia Harrell.[105]

 

John and Winnefred Harrell’s Children

 

            John and Winnefred Harrell’s children include the following.

 

Thomas Harrell

Josuah Harrell

James Harrell

Riddick Harrell

Ephraim Harrell

Ritty Harrell Hughs

Zilpha Harrell Harrell

John Harrell

Penelope Harrell

Mary Harrell

Cynthia Harrell

 

Thomas Harrell
Joshua Harrell
James Harrell

[page 90] 

 

Riddick Harrell Sr. (b. c. 1803-d. 1873)

 

According to the material provided by Mrs. Marion W. Johnson, of Harrellsville in Hertford County, Riddick Harrell was born around 1803 and married Mary Miller (born around 1808).[106] His will was recorded in Bertie County in October of 1873—his will named Starkey Harrell, the widow of Riddick Harrell Jr., and the children of the latter.[107]

 

Riddick and Mary Harrell’s children

 

Dorsey Harrell (b. c. 1824)

Penelope Harrell Freeman (b. c. 1830)

 

Penelope married James Freeman.

Betsy Harrell Williams (b. c. 1829)

 

Betsy married B. B. Williams on January 20, 1850. He was a Baptist Minister in Harrellsville, Hertford County. She died August 12, 1896.

Reddick Harrell Jr. (b. c. 1836)

 

When Reddick Sr. wrote his will in 1873, his son, Reddick Jr., was already deceased—Reddick Sr. provided for Junior’s widow and children.[108] Reddick Jr. married Lucy Hobbs.

Mary Ann Harrell Hobbs (b. c. 1839)

 

Mary Ann married Charles Hobbs.

David Harrell ( b. c. 1841)

 

David married Annie Hobbs.

Joseph Harrell (b. c. 1846)

 

Starkey Taylor Harrell (b. 1849)

 

Starkey was born November 10, 1849 in Bertie County, and he died September 17, 1924 in Norfolk, Virginia.

 

Starkey Taylor Harrell married Olivia A. T. Baker on June 11, 1873. Starkey and Olivia’s children were Leslie E. Harrell (b. September 28, 1874 in Bertie County), Mae Varona Harrell Lowe (b. April 10, 1882), and Herman Thomas Harrell (b. December 10, 1886 in Bertie County). The names Starkey, Taylor, Leslie, and Herman, as well as the resting place of Norfolk are all familiar names in the Nicholas J. Harrell family of 1880 in Hertford County (see chapter 8)—but I cannot find a connection.[109]

 [page 91]

Ephraim Harrell

 

            According to John Harrell’s 1814 will, his son, Ephraim, had a daughter named Martha Harrell.

Ritty Harrell Hughs
Zilpha Harrell Harrell

 

John and Winnefred’s daughter, Zilpha Harrell, married Amos Harrell in Bertie County on May 18, 1808. Her husband, Amos Harrell, was named as an executor to her father’s will in 1814.

John Harrell
Penelope Harrell
Mary Harrell
Cynthia Harrell

 

Nancy (b. c. 1760)

 

            Nancy was a daughter of Lemuel Sr. and Mary Harrell.

Elijah (b. c. 1765; died 1795)

 

Elijah Harrell was Lemuel Sr. and Mary Harrell’s son. His will was written on October 16, 1795, and recorded in the November Term, 1795. He apparently did not marry and died at a relatively young age. He named his mother, Mary; brothers, Lemuel and John Harrell; his brother, Lemuel and James Swinhow Grover Sr. were executors on the will.[110]

Reuben (b. c. 1765)

 

            Reuben was probably Lemuel Sr. and Mary Harrell’s youngest child.

[page 92]

Solomon Harrell, son of John

Judith Harrell Higgs, daughter of John

Lucy Harrell Davenport, daughter of John

Amos Harrell, son of John (b. c. 1740)

 

            There is a marriage record for Amos Harrell and Charity Rutland in Bertie County on November 8, 1774. It may be for John’s son, Amos. Amos was still around in 1780, when his brother, Lemuel Sr., named him his executor in his Bertie County will.

 

            There is a will for an Amos Harrell in Bertie County dated September 16, 1805, and probated at the February Term of 1806.[111] In his will, Amos identified his wife, Elizabeth (probably not his first wife); his children, Betsey, Parthenia, Sally, and Nancy B. Harrell; and his married daughters, Renna Peele and Charity Powell (the latter could have been named for his first wife).

 

Amos Harrell’s Children

           

            I am not certain which children were with Amos’ first wife, Charity Rutland, and which, if any, were with his wife, Elizabeth—but his children included the following.          

 

Renna Harrell Peele
Charity Harrell Powell (b. c. 1777)

 

Amos’ daughter, Charity, married Jesse Powell in 1798—so she was probably born around 1777.

Betsey Harrell
Parthenia Harrell
Sally Harrell
Nancy B. Harrell

 

Gideon Harrell, son of John

 [page 93]

Richard Harrell Jr.

Martha Harrell Sheppard, daughter of Richard

Zilpha Harrell Scott, daughter of Richard

 

Zilpha married James Scott before 1761 (date of her father’s will).

Elizabeth Harrell Spivey, daughter of Richard

Sarah Harrell Hobbs, daughter of Richard

Ann Harrell Felton, daughter of Richard

Margaret Harrell Hill, daughter of Richard

Mary Harrell Eason, daughter of Richard

 

Isaac Harrell (died 1815)

 

            This Isaac was probably the same person who witnessed a deed in 1733, in the area of southern Bertie County along with John Harrell and John Junior. Then on August 11, 1739, Isaac bought 140 acres on the north side of the Maratuck River. He apparently stayed in the area, and in 1753, he was again a witness on a deed—the other witnesses were John Harrell, Jesse Harrell, Israel Harrell, and Hardy Harrell.[112] Isaac’s proximity to the family of John Jr./Sr. (discussed in a previous section), suggests they were probably related, but I have not yet been able to connect Isaac to any of the other Harrell families.

 

Isaac was on the tax lists for Bertie County from 1757 through 1761. He was in the 1787 State census for Bertie, and the 1790 U. S. census. The 1787 census shows his household with all four of his sons in place and under 20 years of age—three of his daughters were also shown. In 1790, they all still seem to have been in place.

 

            Isaac’s will was probated at the May Court in 1815. In his will, he identified his wife, Patience; his daughters, Jemima, Sally, Betsey, and Jennett; and his sons, Job, Amos, Joseph, and Merideth. He also identified several of his grandsons. An executor for his will was Josiah Harrell.[113]

 

Isaac and Patience Harrell’s Children

 

Job Harrell, son of Isaac

 [page 94]

            Job’s children were:

Noah Harrell

Isaac Harrell

Thomas Harrell

George Harrell

 

Amos Harrell, son of Isaac

 

            Amos Harrell’s children were:

John Harrell

Joseph Harrell, son of Isaac

 

            Joseph’s children were:

Samuel Harrell

Henry Harrell

 

Merideth Harrell, son of Isaac

Jemima Harrell, daughter of Isaac

Sally Harrell, daughter of Isaac

Betsey Harrell, daughter of Isaac

Jennett Harrell, daughter of Isaac

 

George Harrell (born before 1710)

 

            There is a deed indicating George owned land in southern Bertie County before 1731. The deed, dated April 4, 1731, reflects the purchase of land by George House from William Eason which was adjacent to the lands of George Harrell, Edward Harrell, John Yelverton, and James Parker.[114] There is no recorded deed for George’s purchase of the land, so he probably inherited it by will.

 [page 95]

            In 1758, George was a Constable, and one of his responsibilities was to compile a tax list in his district (see Table 5, page 26). The Harrells on his list were Henry, son of Edward; James; John Jr./Sr.; John Jr.’s widow, Mary; Josuah, son of Edward; Moses; and Richard Harrell. George was certainly related to some or all of the Harrells on his list, but there is no evidence yet to support the connection.

 

Absolom Harrell (died 1757)

 

            Absolom was also among the early Harrell settlers in southern Bertie County. He is on the early tax lists (see Table 5, page 26), and his widow, Mary, stands in his place on the lists for 1757 and 1758. In addition, the tax lists show a John Harrell, son of Absolom.

 

John Harrell, son of Absolom

 

 


Notes

[1] Hathaway, North Carolina Register, vol. 2, no. 4, page 613. Hathaway’s reference is to Thos. Jarrell, but there were no Jarrells in the area, and there are other references to Thomas Harrell in this particular area.

[2] Bertie County deeds, 1734, Book D, page 190); 1735, Book E, page 42, and Book E, page 49; 1736, Book E, page 467 and Book E, page 457.

[3] Bertie County deed, 1738, Book E, page 350.

[4] Bertie County deeds, 1743, Book F, page 494, and Book F, page 495.

[5] Bertie County deed, Book F, page 495.

[6] Bertie County will, Book A, pages 162-163.

[7] Bertie County will, Book C, pages 23-24.

[8] Bertie County deed, Book C, page 17.

[9] Bertie County deeds, 1728, Book C, page 22; 1729, Book C, page 119.

[10] Bertie County deed, 1729, Book C, page 185.

[11] Paul Drake, What Did They Mean By That (Bowie, Md., 1994), page 125.

[12] Bertie County deeds, August 30, 1733, Book D, page 28; August 3, 1733, Book D, page 50.

[13] Bertie County deeds, 1735, Book D, page 191; 1742, Book F, page 402.

[14] Bertie County deeds, 1753, Book G, page 474; 1754, Book H, page 74.

[15] Hathaway, vol. 3, page 444.

[16] Hathaway, “Abstract of Bertie County Wills,” North Carolina Register, vol. 2, no. 3, page 336.

[17] Bertie County deeds, 1754, Book H, page 74.

[18] Hathaway, “Miscellaneous Items,” North Carolina Register, vol. 3, no. 3, page 443.

[19] Bertie County will, Book 7, page 164. Also in Grimes, North Carolina Wills and Inventories, pages 219-222.

[20] Bertie County will, Book C, page 25.

[21] Hathaway, North Carolina Register, vol. 1, no. 2, page 289.

[22] Bertie County deed, Book C, page 22.

[23] Bertie County deed, Book C, page 119.

[24] Bertie County deed, Book C, page 177.

[25] Drake, page 125. Bertie County deeds, 1733, Book D, page 28; Book D, page 43; Book D, page 50.

[26] Bertie County deeds, 1737, Book E, page 291; 1738, Book E, page 498.

[27] Bertie County deeds, 1747, Book G, page 95. Also see the transfer of this land in 1742, Bertie County deed, Book F, page 335. Grimes, North Carolina Wills and Inventories, pages 222-225. Bertie County deeds, May 13, 1751, Book G, page 365; Book G, page 366; Book G, page 366.

[28] Bertie County deeds, 1751, Book G, page 365; 1749, Book H, page 346.

[29] Bertie County deed, Book G, page 512.

[30] Bertie County deeds, 1755, Book H, page 180; 1756, Book H, page 286.

[31] Grimes, North Carolina Wills and Inventories, pp. 219-222.

[32] Grimes, North Carolina Wills and Inventories, pp. 222-225.

[33] Bertie County deeds, 1751, Book G, page 365; 1749, Book H, page 346.

[34] Bertie County will, Book A, pages 96-97.

[35] Bertie County wills, 1783, Book C, page 67; 1767, Book A, page 96. Also Hathaway, North Carolina Register, “Abstract of Bertie County Wills,” vol. 2, no. 3, pages 336-337.

[36] Bertie County deed, Book G, page 423.

[37] Hathaway, “Miscellaneous Items,” North Carolina Register,  vol. 3, pages 444-445.

[38] Grimes, Abstract of North Carolina Wills, page 153.

[39] Bertie County deed, 1782, Book M, page 564; 1780, Book M, page 528.

[40] This work is loose-leaf, and privately circulated—it was compiled by Lucy Elliott Hollowell of Woodland, North Carolina, under the title “The Harrell Family of Gates County” dated March 1968.

[41] The information from the 1769 Bertie tax list is from: Ratcliff, vol. 1, page 89; from the Hertford County, Murdree's tax lists see Table 3 above; from the 1781 tax list see Ratcliff, vol. 2, page 86; from 1786/1787 state census see the transcription by Alvaretta Kenan, State Census of North Carolina, 2nd edition, 1973, pages 11 and 43.

[42] Bertie County will, Book C, page 67. Also in  Hathaway, “Abstract of Bertie County Wills,” North Carolina Register, vol. 2, no. 3, page 336.

[43] Hathaway, “Abstract of Bertie County Wills,” North Carolina Register, vol. 2, no. 3, pages 336-337.

[44] Bertie County deed, Book G, page 366.

[45] Bertie County wills, Book A, page 46; for Israel Hardy’s will Book C, page 59.

[46] Bertie County deed, Book M, page 528.

[47] Bertie County deed, Book M, page 564.

[48] Bertie County deed, Book C, page 59. Also in Hathaway, “Abstract of Bertie County Wills,” North Carolina Register, vol. 2, no. 3, page 336.

[49] Bertie County deed, Book G, page 365.

[50] Bertie County will, Book D, pages 82-83.

[51] Bertie County will, Book F, page 167.

[52] Bertie County deed, Book M, page 564.

[53] Bertie County deed, Book G, page 366.

[54] Mary’s family name is included in a family file of John Jr.’s sons, Jesse and Elisha—both of whom moved to Robeson County. Family Tree Maker, Broderbund, vol. 17, tree no. 1497.

[55] Northampton County deed, Book 1, page 130. Also in Margaret M. Hofmann, Abstracts of Deeds, Northampton County, North Carolina: Deed Books One and Two, page 24.

[56] Bertie County deed, 1749, Book H, page 346; 1756, Book I, page 342.

[57] Bertie County deed, 1749, Book G, page 237; 1754, Book H, page 174.

[58] Bertie County will, Book 7, page 164. Also in Grimes, North Carolina Wills and Inventories, pp. 219-222.

[59] Bertie County deed, Book H, page 380.

[60] Hardy was born and died in Robeson County. His descendants are the main focus of the family tree in the Family Tree Maker, Broderbund, vol. 17, tree no. 1497.

[61] Bertie County will, Book B, page 40.

[62] Elizabeth J. Harrell, The Harrells: Lott Harrell (est. 1770s-c. 1814) of North Carolina and the Mississippi Territory, his Ancestors and Descendants, Los Altos, Ca., 1989, pages 47 and 49. For a more detailed account of Abraham’s descendants, see Elizabeth J. Harrell’s family history, pages 49-54. I have relied heavily on her work for information on Abraham’s descendants. A copy of her work is available at the North Carolina State Library, Raleigh, N. C..

[63] Bertie County deeds, May 1729, Book C, page 119; August 1729, Book C, page 185; 1733, Book D, page 50.

[64] Grimes, Abstract of North Carolina Wills, page 152. Hathaway, “Miscellaneous Items,” North Carolina Register, vol. 3, page 445.

[65] Bertie County deed, Book N, page 58.

[66] Bertie County will, Book B, pages 92-93.

[67] State Census of North Carolina 1784-1787, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 2nd Edition, 1971, page 12.

[68] Bertie County deeds, 1733, Book D, page 50; 1795, Book R, page 166.

[69] State Census of North Carolina 1784-1787, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 2nd Edition, 1971, page 93.

[70] Bertie County will, Book A, page 155.

[71] Bertie County deed, Book C, page 177.

[72] Bertie County deed, Book D, page 191.

[73] Bertie County deeds, 1737, Book E, page 191; 1749, Book H, page 397; 1750, Book G, page 338.

[74] Hathaway, North Carolina Historical and Genealogical Register, vol. 1, no. 2, page 226.

[75] Bertie County will, Book B, pages 67-71.

[76] Bertie County deed, Book N, page 58.

[77] Bertie County deeds, Book N, page 56; Book N, page 58.

[78] Bertie County wills, Book F, pages 127-128; for Jamima’s will see, Hathaway,  “Abstract of Bertie County Wills,” North Carolina Register, vol. 2, no. 4, page 517.

[79] Bertie County will, Book G, page 279.

[80] Bertie County deed, Book N, page 58.

[81] Bertie County deeds, 1785, Book N, page 58; 1793, Book R, page 501.

[82] Bertie County will, Book B, page 140. Also in Hathaway, “Abstract of Bertie County Wills,” North Carolina Register, vol. 2, no. 3, page 337.

[83] Bertie County will, Book D, pages 107-108.

[84] Bertie County will, Book E, pages 11-12.

[85] Bertie County will, Book D, page 186.

[86] Bertie County deed, Book D, page 123.

[87] Family Archive CD # 14, World Family Tree, 1997 edition, tree 761, Broderbund Software.

[88] Chowan County deed, Book F-1, page 150; 1731, Hathaway, “Abstract of Conveyances,” North Carolina Register, vol. II, no. 3, page 450; and 1735, Chowan County deed, Book W, page 243.

[89] Bertie County deeds, 1736, Book E, page 467; 1747, Book G, page 98.

[90] Bertie County will, Book A, page 26.  It is also in Hathaway, “Abstract of Bertie County Wills,” North Carolina Register, vol.. 3, page 337.

[91] Family Archive CD # 14, World Family Tree, 1997 edition, tree 761, Broderbund Software.

[92] Hathaway, Ed., “Miscellaneous Items,” North Carolina Register, (July 1901), vol. 2, no. 3, page 465. The original is in Edenton, North Carolina.

[93] Perquimans County deed, 1728, Book B, no. 320, and Winslow, History of Perquimans County N. C., page 94;  Bertie County deed, 1738, Book E, page 312; Perquimans County deed, 1745, Book C, no. 215, and Winslow, page 113; and Perquimans County deed, Book E, no. 51, and Winslow, page 140.

[94] Bertie County deed, Book G, page 98.

[95] Bertie County deeds, June 1753, Book G, page 548; November 1753, Book H, page 55; and 1755, Book H, page 179.

[96] Bertie County deed, Book H, page 189.

[97] Hathaway, “Abstract of Wills,” North Carolina Register, vol. 3, no. 2, page 172.

[98] Perquimans County deed, Book H, no. 40.

[99] Bertie County deed, Book F, page 318.

[100] Bertie County will, Book D, pages 8-9.

[101] Bertie County will, Book G, page 468.

[102] Bertie County deed, 1741, Book F, page 318; 1738, Book E, page 498. In the 1741 deed, the names of Christopher and Henry Harrell appeared together for the first time in North Carolina documents. They appeared together, just as they did in 1678, when the two boys came from Bristol, England to work as contact labor in Northampton County, Virginia for 8 and 10 years respectively. If they were the same Christopher and Henry, they would probably have been in their 70s or even 80s when they witnesses the 1741 deed. Indeed, if they were the same Christopher and Henry, then they were probably closely related to Richard who came out of Nansemond County, Virginia.

[103] Bertie County will, Book A, pages 122-123.

[104] Bertie County will, Book C, page 3.

[105] Bertie County will, Book F, pages 270-271.

[106] Most of the material for Riddick Harrell and his children came from Mrs. Johnson’s reading of the Williams family Bible.

[107] Bertie County will, Book I, page 49.

[108] Bertie County will, Book I, page 49.

[109]The names are very suggestive of another Harrell line that does not, however, appear to be closely related. Josiah Harrell of Hertford County, see Chapter 8 in this work, had a son, Starkey Harrell (b. 1835) and another, Nicholas (b. 1837); the latter had a son named Herman Leslie Harrell (b. 1880). Herman Leslie Harrell’s mother, Amanda Taylor, and her husband Nicholas Harrell lived next to Amanda’s younger brother, Hillory Taylor in Harrellsville in 1880. Hillory Taylor moved to Norfolk, Virginia where he raised a family and stayed. Except for these two cases, the names Herman and Leslie were not commonly used by Harrells at that time. Mae Varona Harrell Lowe lived and died in Harrellsville, Hertford County, which is where Herman Leslie Harrell was born and spent his first 12 years. As far as I know, however, there are no other connections between these two families.

[110] Bertie County will, Book D, page 301.

[111] Bertie County will, Book F, pages 11-12.

[112] Bertie County deeds, 1733, Book D, page 6; 1739, Book F, page 66; and 1753, Book G, page 512.

[113] Bertie County will, Book F, pages 288-289. It is also in Hathaway, “Abstract of Bertie County Will,” North Carolina Register, vol. 2, no. 4, page 517.

[114] Bertie County deed, Book D, page 123.

 

To move about in this site, click on one of the following sections:

HarrellFamilies (Home Page)

Introduction

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 (The Early Harrells in America)

Chapter 2 (Harrells in Chowan County & the Gates area)

Chapter 4 (Hertford County's 1st, 2nd, & 3rd Generations)

Chapter 5 (John T., Eley, Elijah Two, Elisah, Thomas Two & their descendants)

Chapter 6 (Nathan & Elizabeth's Known Descendants)

Chapter 7 (John [b. c. 1794] & Winnifred Harrell, 3rd Generation)

Chapter 8 (Josiah & Anna Harrell, 3rd Generation)

Chapter 9 (Elizabeth Harrell & Silas Parker, 3rd Generation)

Chapter 10 (Immigrants to the 3rd Generation of Hertford County Harrells)

Chapter 11 (Immigrants to the 4th Generation of Hertford County Harrells)